Forestlake Ragamuffin, Part 2

bristling fury 300x266 Forestlake Ragamuffin, Part 2
BRISTLING FURY

If you’ve seen the kids out of Forestlake Ragamuffin, you probably noticed that its coloration is recessive and the teeth transfer is dominant.  I saw a hundred or so kids of the FLR cross onto Tetra Spindazzle and not one was apricot melon in color. Ragamuffin crossed into yellows has produced yellows. I’ve crossed it onto reds to only get shades of red. So if you are looking for that apricot color, I’d suggest you cross into a daylily that shows that color. An inexpensive cross that should be productive would be to cross Ragamuffin back into its parent of DECATUR PIECRUST or cross onto DANCE BALLERINA DANCE.  I  never did it but I should have crossed Ragamuffin back into this year’s introduction CHAMPAGNE AND LACE. Maybe next year I will.

A feature that FLR offers is that it can put teeth on a non teeth daylily. I’ll use my HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO YOU as an example. We had a vibrant purple -red Munson seedling out of MORTICIA that didn’t have any edge and I crossed FLR onto it. The seedling produced proved that FORESTLAKE RAGAMUFFIN can produce edge on a non edged daylily.

John Benz received FORESTLAKE RAGAMUFFIN pre-release from Fran Harding for a trade of STARTLE.  John as was mentioned in an earlier blog with reference to the easy cross of TETRA SPINDAZZLE onto FLR. He made 80 seed and flagged numerous seedlings as keepers. So far John has introduced 5 daylilies from that cross.  His cross pictured in this blog is a cross of FORESTLAKE RAGAMUFFIN x ULTIMATE WEAPON.  Daylily teeth verses Daylily gold edge. The teeth won the edge contest… tomorrow we will Daylily Blog on other hybridizers work with FORESTLAKE RAGAMUFFIN…

Mike

© 2010, Mike. All rights reserved. Copyright extended to images.

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2 Responses to Forestlake Ragamuffin, Part 2

  1. Dave Mussar says:

    Hi Mike,
    Thanks for commenting on FLR’s ability to give up colour and keep the edge. Do you want to comment on its influence on scape height? Seems to me that FLR gives short scapes and runty plants generally. Might just be my perception but would like to hear from others that have used it more. Thanks.

    Dave

  2. Mike says:

    Dave , I will comment tommorrow about what I’ve seen with plant height in Part 4.
    Thanks for question.
    Mike

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